Something different n. 3 – Goma Laca – Afrobrasilidades em 78rpm

Now a real Christmas gift, this one a friend of mine told me about and I think you may like it.

Goma Laca is a project to investigate and rework old Afro-Brazilian records, usually issued only on 78rpm at the start of the 20th century. Those include many traditional Afro-Brazilian genres, like capoeira, embolada, praieiras, cocos, and other genres. It is — obviously — a musical mine, one which is still unexplored.

This CD here presents reworking of these tracks by new Brazilian recording artists, such as Lucas Santtana, Juçara Marçal, and Karina Buhr. They are all situated at the “middle”, so to speak, of Brazilian music ambient right now, they are not popular artists neither household names, instead they’re part of a renewing of MPB for a younger audience. For all of those reasons, maybe you don’t know them — or all of them.

I confess I was usually suspicious of these younger artists, but after listening to this album I’ve noticed I had to change my mind. Maybe it is the original material which is so strong, maybe they were all inspired working on an important project like this.

Anyway, click on the cover below to go to the album’s site and then click on “Baixe o disco”. The liner notes are also availabe, but they are only in Portuguese. If you have any question, send me a note here on the comments and I’ll translate it. And on this link you can find the original 78rpm recordings.

GL_LOGO-1200px_72dpi1-1024x1024

PS: Goma-laca stands in Portuguese for shellac, the material used to make 78rpm records back then.

#54 – Simone – Então é Natal

from 25 de Dezembro (PolyGram, 1995)

Original lyrics:

Então é Natal, e o que você fez?
O ano termina, e nasce outra vez
Então é Natal, a festa Cristã
Do velho e do novo, do amor como um todo
Então bom Natal, e um ano novo também
Que seja feliz quem souber o que é o bem

Então é Natal, pro enfermo e pro são
Pro rico e pro pobre, num só coração
Então bom Natal, pro branco e pro negro
Amarelo e vermelho, pra paz afinal
Então bom Natal, e um ano novo também
Que seja feliz quem, souber o que é o bem

Então é Natal, o que a gente fez?
O ano termina, e começa outra vez
Então é Natal, a festa Cristã
Do velho e do novo, o amor como um todo
Então bom Natal, e um ano novo também
Que seja feliz quem, souber o que é o bem

Harehama, há quem ama
Harehama, ha
Então é Natal, e o que você fez?
O ano termina, e nasce outra vez
Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Mururoa, ha…

É Natal, é Natal, é Natal

I’ve noticed I have already spoke about Simone’s Christmas album on the last year’s Christmas post here on the blog, but now I have an occasion to delve deeper into its meaning and significance…or not.

Simone’s album became a sort of (bad) tradition among Christmas celebrations in Brazil. Simone was born on 1949 and started her career around the 70s. She was always more of a pop singer, in the vein of Barbra Streisand or something like that. She was more famous in 80s, when she made a bunch of shows which broke attendance records. In the 90s I don’t know what else she did besides this Christmas album.

Susan Sontag famously wrote about camp, or the so-bad-it’s-good way of talking about some cultural products. I know that in English there is the word tacky, which can be related to vulgar. Tacky can be translated in Brazil as brega, but even brega has something noteworthy about it, at least as a musical movement in Brazilian pop history. Then there’s the word kitsch. I don’t know in which of the tree categories can Simone’s album be classified.

Actually, the idea behind the album came to her after realizing that Brazil doesn’t have a tradition of Christmas albums such as the ones that are released in the United States. So she recorded an whole album of Christmas, which was sold not only on record stores but also on supermarkets, newsstands, restaurants etc. So this is one of the most sold Brazilian albums, whose figures are counted in the millions and it is still edited every single Christmas.

I think there’s a reason why in Brazil the phonographic industry doesn’t revolve around Christmas. To begin with, our tradition is/was a lot different from that of the States. In the US, Christmas songs developed from Christmas carols, and the tradition of popular or neighborhood choirs is something that stands even now. In Brazil, religion and religious dates are not something to be sung upon. Then there’s the fact that December in Brazil is hot, so recording albums that people listening in their homes with their families doesn’t seem to make sense. Anyway, this album has stuck upon as a burden every Brazilian teenager has to face when their parents or relatives play it on Christmas celebrations.

But what about the lyrics to this one? Actually, it is a Portuguese recasting of “Happy X-Mas (War is Over)”, by John Lennon. The lyrics are really the same, with one exception:

So this is Christmas
And what have you done
Another year over
And a new one just begun

And so this is Christmas
I hope you have fun
The near and the dear ones
The old and the young

A very merry Christmas
And a happy New Year
Let’s hope it’s a good one
Without any fear

And so this is Christmas
For weak and for strong
For rich and the poor ones
The world is so wrong

And so happy Christmas
For black and for white
For yellow and red ones
Let’s stop all the fight

A very merry Christmas
And a happy New Year
Let’s hope it’s a good one
Without any fear

And so this is Christmas
And what have we done
Another year over
And a new one just begun

And so this is Christmas
I hope you have fun
The near and the dear one
The old and the young
A very merry Christmas

And a happy New Year
Let’s hope it’s a good one
Without any fear

War is over over
If you want it
War is over
Now…

The difference on the two versions of the song comes at the end. While John Lennon wrote a pacifist song related — I think — to the Vietnam War and everything that was happening in the 70s, Simone veered towards a mystical/scatological sense. While John Lennon writes

War is over over
If you want it
War is over
Now…

Simone says

Harehama, há quem ama
Harehama, ha
Então é Natal, e o que você fez?
O ano termina, e nasce outra vez
Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Mururoa, ha…

The first two verses try to dabble on a Hare Krishna chant, and the last one just names places that were hit by atomic bombs: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Mururoa atoll, where France tested nuclear weapons in the 60s and 70s. I know that in a pacifist setting it sounds understandable to put references to nuclear explosion sites, but as this is a Christmas song recorded in the 90s, the overall feeling it creates is just of what the hell is going on here?

Anyway, merry Christmas to you all! I don’t know if I’ll keep up the pace of this blog in the next year (I really hope so), but let me just say I already have my next Christmas special programmed…

#53 – Jorge Ben – Cinco minutos

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Nã, nã, nã, nã, nã, na
Pedi você
Prá esperar 5 minutos só
Você foi embora sem me atender
Não sabe o que perdeu
Pois você não viu, você não viu…
Como eu fiquei
Pedi você
Prá esperar 5 minutos só
Você foi embora, embora, embora
Sem me atender…
Pois você não viu…
Não sabe o que perdeu
Pois você não viu, não viu, não viu
Como eu fiquei
Dizem que foi chorando, sorrindo, cantando
Os meus amigos, meus amigos, até disseram
Que foi amando, amando
Pois você não sabe, você não sabe
E nunca, e nunca,
E nunca, e nunca,
E nunca, e nunca, e nunca
Vai saber porque
Pois você não sabe quanto vale 5 minutos, 5 minutos
Na vida
Pois você não sabe e nunca vai saber porque
Pois você não sabe quanto valem 5 minutos
Na vida

Translated lyrics:

No, no, no, no, no, no
I asked you to wait just five minutes
But you went away without seeing me
You don’t know what you’ve lost
Because you haven’t seen
How I became
asked you to wait just five minutes
But you went away without seeing me
You don’t know what you’ve lost
Because you haven’t seen
How I became
They say I was crying, laughing, singing
My friends, my friends said
That I was loving, loving
But you don’t know
And you never, never
And you never, never
And never, never ever
Will know because
You don’t know how much five minutes
Are worth in life
You don’t know and you’ll never known
How much five minutes are worth

So even alchemy has an end…With this song I finish the task of translating A Tábua de Esmeralda. I hope you have learned anything from the translations and the commentaries. I wish I was a scholar on Brazilian music or something like that, but even though I’m not an expert, I try to do my best here.

This song always seemed a little bit displaced on the album for me, but translating it I noticed it isn’t. Why don’t you wait just a couple of seconds, a minute, two, three, or even five? Why? You’ll never know how much time is worth if you’re always in a hurry.

One nice thing in this song is its use of the strings. According to the technical info to the album, the arrangements were composed by Oscar Milito, who was a piano player on Bossa Nova era and later a studio musician. He recorded with almost everyone during that era, but certainly he isn’t nearly as famous as the Tropicália arranger Rogério Duprat. Here you can hear a song by Marcos Valle to the Brazilian novela “Selva de Pedra” whose arrangements are by Milito.

Another arranger on the album was Hugo Bellard, who recorded with everybody relevant those days, according to Wikipedia. Besides recording with Ivan Lins, he also worked with “Pery Ribeiro, Leny Andrade, Marcos Valle, Banda Veneno de Erlon Chaves, Taiguara, além de tocar em discos de Raul Seixas (Raulzito), Marcos Valle, Marisa Gata Mansa, Doris Moteiro, Lucio Alves, Herminio Belo de Carvalho, João Nogueira, Tito Madi, Evinha, Roberto Ribeiro, Geraldo Vespar, Milton Nascimento, Agnaldo Timoteo, Silvio Cesar, O Terço” and others.

———

Only now I’ve seen this Tiny Mix Tapes piece about this album. It says a lot of the things I’ve said here, on a better English and much more concise than I did here. And it features some addition information, so I encourage you to take a couple of minutes to read it.

———

I’m thinking about translating Gal Costa’s first album, that one released in 1969. I’ll start this later week on a more slow pace, but I plan to end this in a week. Before I start translating that album, I’ll post something Christmas-related tomorrow. See ya.

#52 – Jorge Ben – Hermes Trismegisto e sua celeste tábua de esmeralda

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Hermes Trismegisto e sua celeste tábua de esmeralda

Hermes Trismegisto escreveu
com uma ponta de diamante em uma lâmina de esmeralda

O que está embaixo é como o que está no alto,
e o que está no alto é como o que está embaixo.

E por essas coisas fazem-se os milagres de uma coisa só.
E como todas essas coisas são e provêm de um
pela mediação do um,
assim todas as coisas são nascidas desta única coisa por adaptação.

O sol é seu pai, a lua é a mãe.
O vento o trouxe em seu ventre.
A terra é seu nutriz e receptáculo.

O Pai de tudo, o Thelemeu do mundo universal está aqui.
O Pai de tudo, o Thelemeu do mundo universal está aqui.

Sua força ou potência está inteira,
se ela é convertida em terra.

Tu separarás a terra do fogo e o sutil do espesso,
docemente, com grande desvelo.
Pois Ele ascende da terra e descende do céu
e recebe a força das coisas superiores
e das coisas inferiores.

Tu terás por esse meio a glória do mundo,
e toda obscuridade fugirá de ti.
e toda obscuridade fugirá de ti.

É a força de toda força,
pois ela vencerá qualquer coisa sutil
e penetrará qualquer coisa sólida.
Assim, o mundo foi criado.
Disso sairão admiráveis adaptações,
das quais aqui o meio é dado.

Por isso fui chamado Hermes Trismegistro,
Por isso fui chamado Hermes Trismegistro,

tendo as três partes da filosofia universal.
tendo as três partes da filosofia universal.

O que disse da Obra Solar está completo.
O que disse da Obra Solar está completo.

Hermes Trismegisto escreveu com uma ponta de diamante em uma lâmina de esmeralda (2x).
This is the high-point on the album, the song from where the album takes its title and, yet, I won’t translate it here. Why? Because there is already a translation of this song. How? Let me explain.

I have already tried to outline of the Hermetic philosophy here and I think I’ve mentioned that it was deeply related to alchemy. Alchemy’s chief text is this piece here, known in its Latin name as the Tabula Smaragdina, or Emerald Tablet. The Emerald Tablet explains how alchemy is done.

Starting with the principle that there is a correspondence between everything in the universe, celestial and below, alchemy holds that one thing can be changed into another. Alchemy proceeds by separating the diverse elements and then adapting those different elements into different configurations. Usually this was done with some chemical apparatuses, using fire, air, or other of the primordial elements. By making this, the alchemist gathers a holding on the constitution of things, becoming a kind of a master of Nature.

There is one point of contention here — which can be seen in the translation — which is the so-called thelema, rendered by Jorge Ben as thelemeu. The thelema would be the principle that makes the transition from one element into another possible. It would be a dynamic fluid that holds all things together. The contention is if the thelema was another element besides air, fire, etc. or a completely different thing. That doesn’t seem to bother Jorge Ben too much.

Anyway, the Emerald Tablet was originally an Arabic text and then was translated into Latin and other languages. In English, it received a translation by Isaac Newton (yes, that Isaac Newton) and there is another translation in the 17th century. I’ll post both here, which are as follow:

– Isaac Newton’s translation

  1. Tis true without lying, certain & most true.
  2. That which is below is like that which is above & that which is above is like that which is below to do the miracles of one only thing
  3. And as all things have been & arose from one by the mediation of one: so all things have their birth from this one thing by adaptation.
  4. The Sun is its father, the moon its mother, the wind hath carried it in its belly, the earth is its nurse.
  5. The father of all perfection in the whole world is here.
  6. Its force or power is entire if it be converted into earth.
  7. Separate thou the earth from the fire, the subtle from the gross sweetly with great industry.
  8. It ascends from the earth to the heaven & again it descends to the earth & receives the force of things superior & inferior.
  9. By this means you shall have the glory of the whole world
  10. & thereby all obscurity shall fly from you.
  11. Its force is above all force. For it vanquishes every subtle thing & penetrates every solid thing.
  12. So was the world created.
  13. From this are & do come admirable adaptations whereof the means (or process) is here in this. Hence I am called Hermes Trismegist, having the three parts of the philosophy of the whole world
  14. That which I have said of the operation of the Sun is accomplished & ended.

– The 17th century translation published on the Theatrum Alchemicum (1613)

  1. This is true and remote from all cover of falsehood
  2. Whatever is below is similar to that which is above. Through this the marvels of the work of one thing are procured and perfected.
  3. Also, as all things are made from one, by the [consideration] of one, so all things were made from this one, by conjunction.
  4. The father of it is the sun, the mother the moon. The wind bore it in the womb. Its nurse is the earth, the mother of all perfection.
  5. Its power is perfected. If it is turned into earth,
  6. Separate the earth from the fire, the subtle and thin from the crude and [coarse], prudently, with modesty and wisdom.
  7. This ascends from the earth into the sky and again descends from the sky to the earth, and receives the power and efficacy of things above and of things below.
  8. By this means you will acquire the glory of the whole world,
  9. And so you will drive away all shadows and blindness.
  10. For this by its fortitude snatches the palm from all other fortitude and power. For it is able to penetrate and subdue everything subtle and everything crude and hard.
  11. By this means the world was founded
  12. And hence the marvelous conjunctions of it and admirable effects, since this is the way by which these marvels may be brought about.
  13. And because of this they have called me Hermes Tristmegistus since I have the three parts of the wisdom and philosophy of the whole universe.
  14. My speech is finished which I have spoken concerning the solar work

There is also the Latin translation which is the basis for all of the translations above:

  1. Verum, sine mendacio, certum et verissimum:
  2. Quod est inferius est sicut quod est superius, et quod est superius est sicut quod est inferius, ad perpetranda miracula rei unius.
  3. Et sicut res omnes fuerunt ab uno, meditatione unius, sic omnes res natae ab hac una re, adaptatione.
  4. Pater eius est Sol. Mater eius est Luna, portavit illud Ventus in ventre suo, nutrix eius terra est.
  5. Pater omnis telesmi[12] totius mundi est hic.
  6. Virtus eius integra est si versa fuerit in terram.
  7. Separabis terram ab igne, subtile ab spisso, suaviter, magno cum ingenio.
  8. Ascendit a terra in coelum, iterumque descendit in terram, et recipit vim superiorum et inferiorum.
  9. Sic habebis Gloriam totius mundi.
  10. Ideo fugiet a te omnis obscuritas.
  11. Haec est totius fortitudinis fortitudo fortis, quia vincet omnem rem subtilem, omnemque solidam penetrabit.
  12. Sic mundus creatus est.
  13. Hinc erunt adaptationes mirabiles, quarum modus est hic. Itaque vocatus sum Hermes Trismegistus, habens tres partes philosophiae totius mundi.
  14. Completum est quod dixi de operatione Solis.

As you can see, Jorge Ben’s song is an exact translation of the Emerald Tablet. I don’t know if he just composed the music to an already existing Portuguese translation or if he translated it himself from some modern language. It is interesting, nonetheless, to see Jorge Ben and Isaac Newton on the same page!

Jorge Ben’s song has a little introduction in which he just states that “Hermes Trismegistus wrote on an emerald tablet using a diamond stylus”.

And below you can see an artistic rendition of the Emerald Tablet from a book by Heinrich Khunrath in the 17th century.

800px-Emerald_tabletPS: you may have noticed that I’ve skipped two songs on A Tábua de Esmeralda, “Zumbi” and “Brother”. I did that because the former was already translated here, and the latter was composed in English.

 

#51 – Jorge Ben – O namorado da viúva

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Namomorarado da viúva
Namomorarado da viúva

O namorado da viúva
Passou por aqui

Apressado, pensativo, desconfiado
Olhando prá todos os lados
Pois ele soube
Que na cidade
As apostas subiram dizendo que ele
Não vai dar conta do recado

Que viúva é essa?
Que todos querem mas têm medo
Têm receio de ser dono dela
Dizem que ela tem um dote
Físico e financeiro invejável (eu quero ver!)

O namorado da viúva
Passou por aqui

Namomorarado da viúva
Namomorarado da viúva

Translated lyrics:

The widow’s lover
The widow’s lover

The widow’s lover
Passed by

In a hurry, pensive, suspicious
Looking both sides
Because he knew that in the city
The stakes are high telling
That he won’t make it

Who’s that widow
That everybody wants but everyone is afraid
They fear being her owner
They say she has an enviable
Physical and financial dowry

The widow’s lover
Passed by

The widow’s lover
The widow’s lover

I thought this song was just a strange love song, but actually it is much stranger than that. According to that interview I’ve mentioned on “O homem da gravata florida” post, this song is about another alchemist figure: Nicolas Flamel.

Nicolas Flamel was a 13/14th-century French scrivener and manuscript-seller who, according to Wikipedia (once again!), was thought after his death to have been an alchemist. One of his achievements, according to legend, was that he discovered the Philosopher’s Stone and immortality. Unfortunately, there seem to be no evidence that Flamel is in this world anymore.

Nicolas_Flamel_Histoire_critiqueThe widow in the song was his wife Pernelle, who was a rich widow who had survived already two marriages when she married Flamel. After burying two husbands, I would also be afraid to marry her.

One thing I didn’t know was that the cover to A Tábua de Esmeralda comes from a hieroglyphical book attributed to Nicolas Flamel. Actually, when I saw his name on that interview I noticed that on the cover there is the inscription “Figures de N. Flamel”. Actually, it comes from a drawing took from some figures — so it seems to be — from the Cemitère des Innocents in Paris, which existed from the Middle Ages until the 18th century. I read once that during the 14th and 15th centuries, Paris had a shortage of land to bury people because of the plague, so they started exhuming the bodies and placing the bones on the catacombs, which became full. The so-called hieroglyphs from this cemetery,  recorded by Nicolas Flamel or later, can be seem as an interesting source for knowing this lost cemetery.

The original drawing for the Tábua de Esmeralda album is as follows.

arcade

#50 – Jorge Ben – Minha teimosia, uma arma pra te conquistar

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

A minha teimosia é uma arma pra te conquistar
Eu vou vencer pelo cansaço
Até você gostar de mim, mulher, mulher
Mulher graciosa, alcança a honra
Você alcançou, mulher
Minha amada, minha querida, minha formosa
Vem e me fala que eu sou o seu lírio
E você é minha rosa
Mostra-me teu rosto
Fazei-me ouvir a tua voz
Põe estrelas em meus olhos
Músicas em meus ouvidos
Põe alegria em meu corpo
Junto com amor de você
Mulher, mulher
La, la, la, la
Mulher, mulher
Por que você não pensa
E volta pra mim
Por que você não vem?

Translated lyrics:

My stubbornness is a way to seduce you
I’ll conquer you in the end
And you’ll like me, woman
Gracious woman, you’ve achieved the honor
You’ve accomplished, woman
My loved one, my dear one, my beautiful one
Come and tell me I’m your lily
And you’re my rose
Show me your face
Make me hear your voice
Put stars in my eyes
Music on my ears
Happiness in my body
And your love
Woman, woman
La, la, la, la
Woman, woman
Why don’t you think again
And come back to me
Why don’t you come back?

Another love song from A Tábua de Esmeralda. I don’t have much to say about this one, though I enjoy it very much too. One thing I like is how there’s a change of perspective, if you think about it, in the lyrics. At the beginning, it sounds like Jorge Ben is only trying to seduce a woman, but in the end it is suggested that she dumped him and that he wants that she comes back to him. There was a limit even for Jorge Ben’s seduction powers.

I’ve noticed that in the last lyrics I’ve put here I forgot to mention something that is said. In “Eu vou torcer”, Jorge Ben says he’ll cheer up for “all the useful things one can buy with ten cruzeiros“. I forgot to mention what are cruzeiros.

Cruzeiro was the Brazilian currency used from 1942 to 1967 and then intermittently from 1970 to 1986. The cruzeiro replaced the réis or mil-réis, which were the Brazilian-Portuguese currency during colonial times and then Brazilian imperial era. What happened during the 20th century is that Brazil was constantly menaced by rising inflation, so the money was devaluated constantly. The cruzeiros were a way to restore stability to Brazilian money.

C082.fIn 1967 the cruzeiro was replaced by the cruzeiro novo, only to come back again in 1970. In 1986, because of rampant inflation, the cruzeiros were replaced by the cruzados, created by the Plano Cruzado. The cruzados failed to control inflation, and were replaced a few years later, once again by the cruzeiros.

cruzado 1 cruzado 2Brazil only reached a manageable situation of its economic problems in 1993, when the cruzeiro was replaced by the real, the now current Brazilian currency. The real cut a lot of the zeros on Brazilian money and was advertised by the economic team behind it — led by future president Fernando Henrique Cardoso — because 1 real could buy a Christmar turkey. How the prices have risen since then…

One interesting thing is that the word réis was the plural of the word real. As colonial money devaluated, nobody had a single real, so people started using the word réis to refer to the currency. In a way, then, Brazilian latest currency is a renovation of its first currency.

Another thing to notice is the fascination with the cruzeiro and cruzado thing. Both words have a relation to the cross, but they don’t have a religious meaning here. The cruzeiro is the chief constellation on the Southern sky and one which is bound up in Brazilian flag and, one might say, identity.

cruzeiro do sul

bandeira

#49 – Jorge Ben – Eu vou torcer

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Eu vou torcer pela paz
Pela alegria, pelo amor
Pelas moças bonitas
Eu vou torcer, eu vou

Pelo inverno, pelo sorriso
Pela primavera, pela namorada
Pelo verão, pelo céu azul
Pelo outono, pela dignidade
Pelo verde lindo desse mar
Pelas moças bonitas eu vou torcer, eu vou

Eu vou torcer pela paz
Pela alegria, pelo amor
Pelas moças bonitas
Eu vou torcer, eu vou

Pelas coisas úteis que se pode comprar
Com dez cruzeiros
Pelo bem estar, pela compreensão
Pela agricultura celeste, pelo coração
Pelo jardim da cidade, pela sugestão
Pelo Santo Tomás de Aquino
Pelo meu irmão
Pelo Gato Barbieri,
Pelo mengão
Pelo meu amigo que sofre do coração

Pelas moças bonitas
Eu vou torcer, eu vou
Eu vou torcer pela paz
Pela alegria, pelo amor

Pelas moças bonitas
Eu vou torcer, eu vou
Pelas dondocas bonitas
Eu vou torcer, eu vou.

Translated lyrics:

I’ll cheer up for peace, happiness and love
I’ll cheer up for beautiful ladies
I’ll cheer up, I will

I’ll cheer up for winter, for smiles
For the spring, for the girlfriends,
For the summer, for the blue skies
For autumn, for dignity
For the green color of this beautiful sea
For all the beautiful ladies, I will

I’ll cheer up for peace, happiness and love
I’ll cheer up for beautiful ladies
I’ll cheer up, I will

I’ll cheer up for all the useful things
One can buy with ten bucks
I’ll cheer up for good living, comprehension
For celestial agriculture, for the heart
For the city’s gardens, for the suggestions
For Aquinas, for my brother
For Gato Barbieri, for Flamengo
For my friend who suffers from a heart condition

For the beautiful ladies
I’ll support them, I will
I’ll cheer up for peace, happiness and love

This is also a more simple song than the first ones on the album, but it has a strong message for peace, easiness, and living well, which fits nicely into Jorge Ben’s persona. It also gives material for exploring some cool things about Brazilian culture.

The verb torcer has some very different meanings for someone who’s trying to learn Brazilian Portuguese. Its first meaning is to wring or to squeeze. The second meaning of the word is to support someone or some team. How come the same word has so different meanings?

It has to do with the introduction of football in Brazil. When football came to Brazil on the feet of Charles Miller and other English and German immigrants around the turn of the 19th to the 20th century, it was an aristocratic sport. People dressed in their best clothes to watch the games, which were conducted on a spirit of camaraderie. Many of the supporters that went to the games, that time, were women, usually rich and educated who were wives, sisters and related to the players, but nonetheless women that cheered up enthusiastically on the games and were an important part of it. Those women usually went to the matches with scarf or handkerchiefs, which they nervously squeezed during the game. Because of this, the supporters came to be known as torcidas. The general name for a sports supporter in Brazil, then, comes from what women did on the attendance for soccer matches in the early 20th century.

During the course of the 20th century the feminine presence on soccer stadiums diminished, but recently, with the gentrification of football, it has risen again. You can get to know some of the problems women encounter going to the pitch reading this brief article.

I had some trouble keeping the overall harmony of the song and the lyrics. In other words, I failed blatantly. But I’ve tried not being too repetitive, so I used interchangeably the words support and cheer up for. I hope I haven’t wrecked the whole song.

You’ll notice that Jorge Ben uses the word Mengão. This is also an affectionate way of referring to Brazil most popular football team, Flamengo, which I’m sure all of you know. Flamengo’s torcida is surely the most creative and animated of all torcidas in Brazil and Jorge Ben’s career developed around the same time than Flamengo’s golden age, so he wrote lots of songs about mengo and its players. Jorge Ben himself tried his chance in soccer before turning to music.

There’s also a reference to Aquinas, which reintroduces the Hermetic themes of the album, as Jorge Ben regards Aquinas not only as a Catholic saint but also as a major alchemist.

#48 – Jorge Ben – Menina mulher da pele preta

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Essa menina mulher da pele preta,
Dos olhos azuis, do sorriso branco
Não está me deixando dormir sossegado.
Será que ela não sabe que eu fico acordado.
Pensando nela todo dia, toda hora
Passando pela minha janela todo dia, toda hora
Sabendo que eu fico a olhar
com malícia.
A sua pele preta
com malícia.
Seus olhos azuis
com malícia
Seu sorriso branco
com malícia.
Seu corpo todo enfim,
com malícia.

Com malícia…

Será que quando, eu fico acordado
Pensando nela, ela pensa um pouco em mim?
Um pouco em mim
Com malícia.
Um pouco em mim
Com malícia.

Um…pouco em mim.
Com malícia.
Essa menina mulher…
Da pele preta
Não está me deixando…
Dormir sossegado.
Será que ela não, não, não
Pensa um pouco em mim, pensa.
Com malícia, com malícia.
Pouco em mim, Pouco em mim
Pouco em mim, Pouco em mim.
Com malícia, com malícia
Um pou pou pou pou pouco em mim
pouco em mim.
Com malícia.
Com malícia.
Essa mulher…
Da pele preta
Da pele preta
Do sorriso branco,
Dos olhos azuis
Não está deixando me…
Dormir sossegado…

Translated lyrics:

This black skinned woman girl
With blue eyes and white smile
It’s not letting me sleep
I wonder if she thinks that I stay awake
Thinking about here everytime everyday
Passing through my window everytime everyday
Knowing that I stand looking at her
With malice
Her black skin
With malice
Her blue eyes
With malice
Her white smile
With malice
All of her body
With malice

Does she thinks about me
When I’m awake thinking about her?
Not even a little bit
With malice
A little bit
With malice

This song probably wouldn’t pass today’s standards about feminism and sexual abuse issues (which is a good thing), but anyway it is a beautiful and captivating song. In its content, it is more simple than the previous songs I’ve posted here: it is just a dark skinned woman with whom Jorge Ben is obsessed about.

One of the things I like about this song is the use of iteration. There are some repetitive notions throughout it, such as menina mulher, which I translated as woman girl, and one usual feature of Jorge Ben’s songs which is the repetition of certain words or sentences one, two, or three times. In the first time what is said doesn’t actually fit into the song, but then Jorge Ben keeps on saying the same thing over and over again and then — almost by magic — the vocals fit into the song as if they were the most natural thing. I’ll point whenever this happen on the album or in other of his albums.

The song also feature a little spoken/sung introduction, which reads like this:

- Pedrinho vai ser papai
- Quem vai ser papai?
- Menina mulher da pele preta
- Menina mulher da pele preta?
- Haha

It can be translated as follows:

- Pedrinho is having a baby
- Who’s having a baby?
- Black skinned woman girl
- Black skinned woman girl?
- Haha

I don’t know if that has its origins on some popular tune or what, but I always liked it. On some notes about Portuguese language, you may know that the suffix -inho serves as diminutive, so Pedro would be the normal name, and Pedrinho is an endearing nick name. This suffix can also be used to lessen one person, saying someone or something is small, unimportant etc. Papai, on its hand, is also an affectionate way of referring to dad. Usually the word is only pai, but on some parts of Brazil people say papai, as they also say mamãe, and not mãe, to refer to their (or someone else’s) mothers.

This repetition of syllables is used more frequently with children. People usually say that a baby or a child is not dormindo (transl., sleeping), but nanando or mimindo, which is just the same thing but more loving, caring and infantile.

As you may know, for a long time it was said that the “Brazilian preference” was for the mulata. The mulata is the same as mulatto, a descendant both of White and Black parents. Needless to say, having a preference for the mulata shows some signs of continuation of the slavery thinking on Brazilian society. On the other hand, it shows how Brazilian society differs from, for example, North American society, as being mixed is, at least superficially, a good thing. Nowadays I sense that the Brazilian fascination with the mulata is lessening, both as racism seems more conspicuous on Brazilian society (which, nonetheless, is also a good thing, as it is not hidden anymore) and public policies regarding the minorities are creating an ambient for people to assume themselves as Black and not as mulatto anymore.

Anyway, one anachronistic feature which is maintained even now is the (in)famous mulata globelezaGlobeleza is a combination of the words Globo and beleza (transl., beauty). Globo is the major media company of Brazil, which you may or may not know from this documentary, and Globeleza is its periodic section devoted to Rio de Janeiro carnival. The mulata globeleza was the dancer that represented carnival for Globo, and she was featured on DAYTIME television, with CHILDREN and FAMILIES watching, covered only with BODY PAINTING.

vv

With that in mind, you can understand that when Janet Jackson showed her left (or right?) boob on television on Super Bowl most Brazilians just answered: “what’s the big deal?”.

For some time (a decade or more), the mulata globeleza was Valéria Valenssa, but in later years she was replaced by someone I don’t know. You can peek a little of my childhood watching the Globeleza spot on Globo’s coverage of Brazilian carnival here.

PS: I’ve translated only part of the lyrics because most of the song is comprised of — you guess — repetitions.

#47 – Jorge Ben – Errare humanum est

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Lá lá lá
Tem uns dias
Que eu acordo
Pensando e querendo saber
De onde vem
O nosso impulso
De sondar o espaço
A começar pelas sombras sobre as estrelas-las-las-las
E depensar que eram os deuses astronautas
E que se pode voar sozinho até as estrelas-las-las
Ou antes dos tempos conhecidos
Conhecidos
Vieram os deuses de outras galáxias-xias-xias
Ou de um planeta de possibilidades impossíveis
E de pensar que não somos os primeiros seres terrestres
Pois nós herdamos uma herança cósmica
Errare humanum est
Errare humanum est
Nem deuses
Nem astronautas
Ô ô ô ô
Eram os deuses astronautas
Lá lá lá lá
Nem deuses
Nem astronautas
Ô ô ô ô
Eram os deuses astronautas
Lá lá lá lá
Eram os deuses astronautas
Ná ná ná ná ná
Dez
Ná ná ná ná ná
Nove
Ná ná ná ná ná
Oito
Ná ná ná ná ná
Sete
Ná ná ná ná ná
Seis
Ná ná ná ná ná
Cinco
Ná ná ná ná ná
Três
Ná ná ná ná ná
Dois
Ná ná ná ná ná
Um
Ná ná ná ná ná
Zero

Translated lyrics:

There are some days that I wake up
Trying to think and desiring to know
From where comes the impulse
To probe the outer space
Beginning with the shadows over the stars
And to think that the Gods were astronauts
And that you can fly by yourself to the stars
Or even think about before times known
Did the gods came from another galaxy
Or from a planet of impossible possibilities?
And to think that we’re not the first terrestrial beings
Because we inherited a cosmic heritage
Errare humanum est
Errare humanum est
Neither gods nor astronauts
Ô ô ô ô
Were the gods astronauts?
Lá lá lá lá
Neither gods nor astronauts
Ô ô ô ô
Were the gods astronauts?
Lá lá lá lá
Were the gods astronauts?
Ná ná ná ná
Ten
Ná ná ná ná
Nine
Ná ná ná ná
Eight
Ná ná ná ná
Seven
Ná ná ná ná
Six
Ná ná ná ná
Five
Ná ná ná ná
Four
Ná ná ná ná
Three
Ná ná ná ná
Two
Ná ná ná ná
One
Ná ná ná ná
Zero

The third track on Tábua de Esmeralda is one of the most concept-heavy songs on the album. It introduces many of the elements of Jorge Ben’s philosophy and curiosity around this time. It is also a document of the penetration of the works of Erich von Däniken in Brazil in the 70s.

As many of you may know, Erich von Däniken was one of the main publicists of the idea that ancient religion and, therefore, ancient gods were not a fabrication of the human mind, but actually aliens which helped introduce civilization to man. As you may also know from a lot of History Channel programming, such an idea is obviously true.

giorgio_tsoukalos_aliens

Erich von Däniken popularity skyrocketed in 1968, when he published Chariots of the Gods?, in which he explained his theories. I’ve read the book when I was a teenager and was deeply impressed by the sheer volume of evidences he finds. Some of them are really convincing, like that Mayan stone table that could represent an astronaut on a starship.

1-12_pacal

Von Däniken’s book was translated in Brazil as Eram os deuses astronautas?, which is rendered in the lyrics when Jorge Ben says “Were the gods astronauts?”.

I love such ancient aliens conspiracy theories. But as a historian myself I’m troubled by their lack of imagination (yes), because it presupposes that human history is a straight line that goes from one place to another in a linear narrative of progress. What is implicitly stated in those theories is that ancient civilizations could not have technological features that we have now, because they were primitive. But ancient people were not necessarily primitive, they only had different cultures than us in the same brains we have. Conspiracy theories, even though they always propose some alternatives to what has really happened, usually lack the imagination to think of really different alternatives to what is already here.

The other reference included in the lyrics is to Seneca’s dictum that to err is human. The full sentence goes like this: “Errare humanum est, sed in errore perseverare diabolicum”, which can be translated as “To err is human, but to persist in error is diabolical”.

I think that what Jorge Ben is intending to do, relating the ancient astronaut hypothesis and what Seneca says, is to imply how the ancient gods were fundamental to the constitution of modern human beings, something von Däniken states has happened at a biological level. In Jorge Ben’s lyrics, however, I think it happens something like what happens in the movie Prometheus. The ancient aliens are our fathers, and our faults — and our virtues — depend on their intentions, even if they are far removed from us right now.

To conclude such way out reflections, I really like the way Jorge Ben uses echo and reverb on this song. They mesh with the samba structure of the song in a beautiful way.

#46 – Jorge Ben – O homem da gravata florida

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Lá vem o homem da gravata florida
Meu deus do céu… que gravata mais linda
Que gravata sensacional
Olha os detalhes da gravata…
Que combinação de côres
Que perfeição tropical
Olha que rosa lindo
Azul turquesa se desfolhando
Sob os singelos cravos

E as margaridas, margaridas
De amores com jasmim
Isso não é só uma gravata
Essa gravata é o relatório
De harmonia de coisas belas
É um jardim suspenso
Dependurado no pescoço
De um homem simpático e feliz
Feliz, feliz porque… com aquela gravata

Qualquer homem feio, qualquer homem feio
Vira príncipe, simpático, simpático, simpático
Porque… com aquela gravata
Êle é esperado e bem chegado
É adorado em qualquer lugar
Por onde ele passa nascem flores e amores
Com uma gravata florida singela
Como essa, linda de viver
Até eu, até eu, até eu, até eu, até eu…

Translated lyrics:

There comes the man with the floral tie
Oh my God what a beautiful tie
What marvelous tie
Look at its details
How the colors combine
What tropical perfection
Look at this beautiful pink
This turquoise blue leaving its leaves
Under the simple cloves

And the daisies, the daisies
In love with the jasmin
That’s not only a tie
This is a report on the harmony
Of beautiful things
It’s a hanging garden
Suspended on the neck
Of a joyful and good-natured guy
Happy, and happy because…

With that tie any ugly man, any ugly man
Becomes a prince, is charming, friendly, and pleasant
Because…with that tie
He is awaited for and welcome
And worshipped anywhere
And wherever he goes flowers and lovers bloom
With a simple floral tie like this
Like this, deadly beautiful
Even myself, even myself, even myself

This is one of the craziest lyrics I know. I mean, how come one could have such an epiphany just looking at the floral tie someone was wearing? Those guys were crazy on acid by that time for sure.

I think there isn’t much to talk about the lyrics. They are kinda simple, as they describe the colors, the types of flower, and the general effect the referred tie has on the narrator. Whenever I think about the song one image that comes to mind is some of Romero Britto’s shameful works, but it is kind of sacrilegious to compare Romero Britto and Jorge Ben.

According to one brief interview I read, the man with the floral tie actually is the German physician, botanist, and alchemist Paracelsus. According to Wikipedia, Paracelsus rejected the ancient theory of the four humors (melancholy, cholera, phlegm, and sanguineous) in favor of a tripartite explanation of the world and the diseases affecting the body which comprised an combustible element (sulphur), a changing element (mercury) and a solid element (salt). The different combination of these three elements explained differences in behavior, alterations in humor etc.

In some way, maybe, the floral pattern of the tie reflects this general Parecelsus philosophy. One should note, however, that even though he rejected the earlier theory of four humors and was considered later an exponent of scientific thinking, because of all the experimental approach he had to biology and medicine, Parecelsus maintains the overall scheme of a correspondence between what is located higher and what is below. After all, the three elements are both in the world and within the human body.

This is the general thought scheme from alchemy, as we shall see later, and it was also a feature of ancient medicine and astrology. It is a principle that continued during the Middle Ages, as one can see in the famous Zodiacal Man from Les Très riches heures du Duc de Berry, an early 15th-century illuminated manuscript. One of the masterpieces of its era. In the picture, the Zodiacal signs are located both in the Sky and in the human body, corresponding to specific places and, even further, specific organs.

©Photo. R.M.N. / R.-G. OjŽda

Cosmological correspondences aside, you can see a picture of the floral-tied man Jorge Ben himself below and here’s a link to that interview from where I got some of the information and the picture.

jorge-ben-trip