#53 – Jorge Ben – Cinco minutos

from A Tábua de Esmeralda (Philips, 1974)

Original lyrics:

Nã, nã, nã, nã, nã, na
Pedi você
Prá esperar 5 minutos só
Você foi embora sem me atender
Não sabe o que perdeu
Pois você não viu, você não viu…
Como eu fiquei
Pedi você
Prá esperar 5 minutos só
Você foi embora, embora, embora
Sem me atender…
Pois você não viu…
Não sabe o que perdeu
Pois você não viu, não viu, não viu
Como eu fiquei
Dizem que foi chorando, sorrindo, cantando
Os meus amigos, meus amigos, até disseram
Que foi amando, amando
Pois você não sabe, você não sabe
E nunca, e nunca,
E nunca, e nunca,
E nunca, e nunca, e nunca
Vai saber porque
Pois você não sabe quanto vale 5 minutos, 5 minutos
Na vida
Pois você não sabe e nunca vai saber porque
Pois você não sabe quanto valem 5 minutos
Na vida

Translated lyrics:

No, no, no, no, no, no
I asked you to wait just five minutes
But you went away without seeing me
You don’t know what you’ve lost
Because you haven’t seen
How I became
asked you to wait just five minutes
But you went away without seeing me
You don’t know what you’ve lost
Because you haven’t seen
How I became
They say I was crying, laughing, singing
My friends, my friends said
That I was loving, loving
But you don’t know
And you never, never
And you never, never
And never, never ever
Will know because
You don’t know how much five minutes
Are worth in life
You don’t know and you’ll never known
How much five minutes are worth

So even alchemy has an end…With this song I finish the task of translating A Tábua de Esmeralda. I hope you have learned anything from the translations and the commentaries. I wish I was a scholar on Brazilian music or something like that, but even though I’m not an expert, I try to do my best here.

This song always seemed a little bit displaced on the album for me, but translating it I noticed it isn’t. Why don’t you wait just a couple of seconds, a minute, two, three, or even five? Why? You’ll never know how much time is worth if you’re always in a hurry.

One nice thing in this song is its use of the strings. According to the technical info to the album, the arrangements were composed by Oscar Milito, who was a piano player on Bossa Nova era and later a studio musician. He recorded with almost everyone during that era, but certainly he isn’t nearly as famous as the Tropicália arranger Rogério Duprat. Here you can hear a song by Marcos Valle to the Brazilian novela “Selva de Pedra” whose arrangements are by Milito.

Another arranger on the album was Hugo Bellard, who recorded with everybody relevant those days, according to Wikipedia. Besides recording with Ivan Lins, he also worked with “Pery Ribeiro, Leny Andrade, Marcos Valle, Banda Veneno de Erlon Chaves, Taiguara, além de tocar em discos de Raul Seixas (Raulzito), Marcos Valle, Marisa Gata Mansa, Doris Moteiro, Lucio Alves, Herminio Belo de Carvalho, João Nogueira, Tito Madi, Evinha, Roberto Ribeiro, Geraldo Vespar, Milton Nascimento, Agnaldo Timoteo, Silvio Cesar, O Terço” and others.

———

Only now I’ve seen this Tiny Mix Tapes piece about this album. It says a lot of the things I’ve said here, on a better English and much more concise than I did here. And it features some addition information, so I encourage you to take a couple of minutes to read it.

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I’m thinking about translating Gal Costa’s first album, that one released in 1969. I’ll start this later week on a more slow pace, but I plan to end this in a week. Before I start translating that album, I’ll post something Christmas-related tomorrow. See ya.

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