#34 – Gal Costa – Mamãe, Coragem (1968)

from Tropicália, ou Panis et Circensis (Philips, 1968)

Original lyrics:

Mamãe, mamãe, não chore
A vida é assim mesmo
Eu fui embora
Mamãe, mamãe, não chore
Eu nunca mais vou voltar por aí
Mamãe, mamãe, não chore
A vida é assim mesmo
Eu quero mesmo é isto aqui

Mamãe, mamãe, não chore
Pegue uns panos pra lavar
Leia um romance
Veja as contas do mercado

Pague as prestações
Ser mãe
É desdobrar fibra por fibra
Os corações dos filhos
Seja feliz
Seja feliz

Mamãe, mamãe, não chore
Eu quero, eu posso, eu quis, eu fiz
Mamãe, seja feliz
Mamãe, mamãe, não chore
Não chore nunca mais, não adianta
Eu tenho um beijo preso na garganta

Eu tenho um jeito de quem não se espanta
(Braço de ouro vale 10 milhões)
Eu tenho corações fora peito
Mamãe, não chore
Não tem jeito
Pegue uns panos pra lavar
Leia um romance
Leia “Alzira morta virgem”
“O grande industrial”

Eu por aqui vou indo muito bem
De vez em quando brinco Carnaval

E vou vivendo assim: felicidade
Na cidade que eu plantei pra mim
E que não tem mais fim
Não tem mais fim
Não tem mais fim

Translated ones:

Mother, mother, don’t cry
That’s how life is
I need to go

Mother, mother, don’t cry
I’ll never come back
Mother, mother, don’t cry
That’s how life is
What I want is really this

Mother, mother, don’t cry
Take some clothes to wash
Read a novel
See the grocery bill

Pay the installments
To be a mother means
Unravelling little by little
Your son’s hearts
Be happy
Be happy

Mother, mother, don’t cry
I want it, I can make it, I wanted it, I did it
Mother, be well
Mother, mother, don’t cry
Don’t you cry ever more, it doesn’t help
I have a kiss stuck in my throat

I’m not easily scared
(A gold arm is worth 10 million bucks)
I have a heart and a chest
Mother, don’t cry
It doesn’t help
Take some clothes to wash
Read a novel
Read “Alzira, the dying virgin”
Or “The great industry man”

Here I’m doing quite fine
Once in a while I party

And that’s how I live: with joy
At the city I’ve created myself
And that doesn’t have an end
It doesn’t have an end
It doesn’t have an end

Second Gal Costa cut from the album. This one was composed by Caetano Veloso and Torquato Neto, whose “Tropicalism for Beginners” we have already read before. I don’t have much to say about it, except that it’s a beautiful track.

Tomorrow I’ll end the album (yes, I know, “Geléia Geral” is still missing) and in the first days of the next week I’ll make a Carnival special. After all, there is nothing so much Brazilian as a good Carnival.

Anúncios

#29 – Caetano Veloso & Gal Costa – Baby

from Tropicália, ou Panis et Circenses (Phillips, 1968)

Original lyrics:

Você precisa
Saber da piscina
Da margarina
Da Carolina
Da gasolina
Você precisa
Saber de mim
Baby, baby
Eu sei
Que é assim
Baby, baby
Eu sei
Que é assim

Você precisa
Tomar um sorvete
Na lanchonete
Andar com gente
Me ver de perto
Ouvir aquela canção
Do Roberto
Baby, baby
Há quanto tempo
Baby, baby
Há quanto tempo

Você precisa
Aprender inglês
Precisa aprender
O que eu sei
E o que eu
Não sei mais
E o que eu
Não sei mais

Não sei
Comigo
Vai tudo azul
Contigo
Vai tudo em paz
Vivemos
Na melhor cidade
Da América do Sul
Da América do Sul   
Você precisa
Você precisa…

Não sei
Leia
Na minha camisa
Baby, baby
I love you
Baby, baby
I love you…

Translated lyrics:

You need to know
About the vaseline
About the margarine
About Caroline
About gasoline
You need to know
About me
Baby, baby
I know that’s the way it is

You need to know
About the ice cream
On the dream
[You need] To walk among people
See me close
Listen to that Roberto [Carlos] song
Baby, baby
How long has it been

You need
To learn English
You need to learn
What I earned
And what I don’t
Already have

I don’t know
With me
Everything’s fine
With you
Everything’s nice
We live
On the best city
Of South America
You need
You need…

I don’t know
Read my shirt
Baby, baby
I love you
Baby, baby
I love you…

This is one of my favorite songs on the album and one the most beautiful. I made a number of alterations as the song doesn’t really have a meaning, but it has a very strong rhyme which is sometimes almost hypnotic on its repetition. It’s a great song in every way that one can conceive a great song.

I read an account by Swedish saxophonist Mats Gustafsson on his all-time favorite albums and he says that this song is what converted him to Brazilian music. As he says, “It’s experimental, but it’s great songs. That’s what really kills me. It’s easy to make experimental music, but it’s hard to make a good song. And when you combine the two like this whole movement did, it just blows my mind.” That’s a great definition of the whole Tropicália thing

As for the translation, in the start of the song I changed “piscina”, which would be rendered as pool, for vaseline. There’s no reason for this besides a strange association with that Flaming Lips’ song and the fact that I can keep the words rhyming with it. Later, I’ve made the song even more oneiric rendering “na lanchonete”, which means exactly what it seems, for “on the dream”, which is the only word that came to my mind to keep the song afloat. The reason I did this was just to have some fun, as I think that making a word-for-word translation wouldn’t make much of a sense.

As a last note, by the end of the song she sings “Vai tudo azul”. This means that everything is fine. In Brazil people also say “Alles blau”, especially where I live, in South Brazil, where there is a strong German presence on the overall culture. I never saw any real German saying “Alles blau”, but maybe there is that saying over there too. What I find interesting is that azul is the color blue, which in English conveys sadness and melancholy but which in Brazil expresses joy and fulfillment.And yes, I know I’ve skipped Gilberto Gil’s “Geléia Geral”, but I found it so hard to translate that I’ll only post it at the end of this album.

#18 – Gal Costa – Pontos de Luz

from Índia (Continental, 1973)

Original lyrics:

Me sinto contente
Me sinto muito contente
Me sinto completamente contente
Ouso dizer
Completamente contente

Me arrisco a falar
Me sinto feliz
Me sinto muito feliz
Me sinto completamente feliz
Ouso dizer
Completamente feliz.

In English:

I feel happy
I feel extremely happy
I feel completely happy
I dare to say
Completely happy

I dare to say
I feel happy
I feel extremely happy
I feel completely happy
I dare to say
Completely happy

Making a post in a hurry and fortunately, this one was easy.

This is from a 1973 album by tropicália-era darling Gal Costa. I don’t have much to say about, only that the album cover was censored by the Brazilian dictatorship (for some obvious reasons) and that the song is a composition by Jards Macalé and outsider poet Wally Salomão. Salomão was one of the most famous members of the “Poesia marginal” movement in Brazil in the seventies and one could think of him as a literary counterpart to the tropicalist movement in music.

As the song is about being always happy, tomorrow I’ll post another way of thinking about happiness, departing once again from the Brazil 70 compilation.

As a bonus, check this version recorded by Jards Macalé: