#31 – Caetano Veloso – Enquanto seu lobo não vem (1968)

from Tropicália, ou Panis et Circensis (Philips, 1968)

Original lyrics:

Vamos passear na floresta escondida, meu amor
Vamos passear na avenida
Vamos passear nas veredas, no alto meu amor
Há uma cordilheira sob o asfalto

(Os clarins da banda militar…)
A Estação Primeira da Mangueira passa em ruas largas
(Os clarins da banda militar…)
Passa por debaixo da Avenida Presidente Vargas
(Os clarins da banda militar…)
Presidente Vargas, Presidente Vargas, Presidente Vargas
(Os clarins da banda militar…)

Vamos passear nos Estados Unidos do Brasil
Vamos passear escondidos
Vamos desfilar pela rua onde Mangueira passou
Vamos por debaixo das ruas

(Os clarins da banda militar…)
Debaixo das bombas, das bandeiras
(Os clarins da banda militar…)
Debaixo das botas
(Os clarins da banda militar…)
Debaixo das rosas, dos jardins
(Os clarins da banda militar…)
Debaixo da lama
(Os clarins da banda militar…)
Debaixo da cama

Translated lyrics:

Let’s take a walk on the hidden forest, my darling
Let’s strode through the avenue
Let’s go through the country, my love, up there
There is a mountain range below the tarmac

(The military band plays…)
Estação Primeira da Mangueira parades through large streets
(The military band plays…)
It passes right below Presidente Vargas avenue
(The military band plays…)
President Vargas, President Vargas, President Vargas
(The military band plays…)

Let’s talk a walk throught the United States
Let’s go undercover
Let’s parade where Mangueira went
Let’s go beneath the streets

(The military band plays…)
Under the bombs, under the banners
(The military band plays…)
Under the boots
(The military band plays…)
Under the roses in the gardens
(The military band plays…)
Under the mud
(The military band plays…)
Under the bed

Another Caetano Veloso cut from the 1968 album and actually I don’t have much to say about it. Only that the military band going through the streets playing under (or over) everything reminds me, of course, of censorship and other horrible things in Brazilian dictatorship. It made me think of famous Chico Buarque’s song called “A Banda”, which I’ll translate tomorrow, because this blog has been too long without a Chico Buarque song.

As for the translation, it is not a hard one. I made some slight changes, though. One of the more important is that the original says “Os clarins da banda militar“, and not exactly “The military band plays”. The clarim is the same thing as a bugle, as you can see below.

clarim

 

And it is not for another reason that the Marvel-universe newspaper, the one where Peter Parker works, is called in Brazil “O clarim diário”, or The daily bugle.

Clarim Diário cópia

 

Another change I’ve made is that I translated vereda as country, as vereda means a track cut through the country’s vegetation. In Brazil, it is usually spoke of as a way through, in an almost metaphorical sense. Probably this is because of the masterpiece written by Guimarães Rosa called Grande Sertão: Veredas. Published in 1956, it is one of the chief works of Brazilian literature, and Rosa is a genius when it comes to language and language play. I can honestly say it is on the same level as Joyce’s Ulysses. The book has been translated with the name The Devil to Pay in the Backlands, which is just a great way to express what goes through the book.

Anúncios

Deixe um comentário

Preencha os seus dados abaixo ou clique em um ícone para log in:

Logotipo do WordPress.com

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta WordPress.com. Sair / Alterar )

Imagem do Twitter

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Twitter. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Facebook

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Facebook. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Google+

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Google+. Sair / Alterar )

Conectando a %s