#22 – Gilberto Gil – Miserere nobis (1968)

from Tropicália, ou Panis et Circensis (Phillips, 1968)

Original lyrics:

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

Já não somos como na chegada
Calados e magros, esperando o jantar
Na borda do prato se limita a janta
As espinhas do peixe de volta pro mar

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

Tomara que um dia de um dia seja
Para todos e sempre a mesma cerveja
Tomara que um dia de um dia não
Para todos e sempre metade do pão

Tomara que um dia de um dia seja
Que seja de linho a toalha da mesa
Tomara que um dia de um dia não
Na mesa da gente tem banana e feijão

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

Já não somos como na chegada
O sol já é claro nas águas quietas do mangue
Derramemos vinho no linho da mesa
Molhada de vinho e manchada de sangue

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

Bê, rê, a – Bra
Zê, i, lê – zil
Fê, u – fu
Zê, i, lê – zil

Ora pro nobis

Translated lyrics:

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

We are not how we were at first
Thin and quiet, waiting for dinner
The supper covers only the plate’s borders
Fish spines back to the sea

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

Let’s hope one day a day will have
To all and always the same beer
Let’s hope one day a day won’t have
To all and always only a slice of bread

Let’s hope one day a day will have
Linen towels covering the tables
Let’s hope one day a day don’t
At our table there’s bean and bananas

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

We are not how we were at first
The sun already shines on the mangue’s quiet water
Let’s pour wine at the table’s linen towels
Drenched in wine and blood stained

Miserere nobis
Ora, ora pro nobis
É no sempre será, ô, iaiá
É no sempre, sempre serão

Bê, rê, a – Bra
Zê, i, lê – zil
Fê, u – fu
Zê, i, lê – zil

Ora pro nobis

And so starts our round-up of the Tropicália album! I won’t speak anything more about it, as it is the most famous thing ever made under the Tropicália banner. So I go directly to the translation.

This is a tricky one, that’s why I decided not to translate the main chorus. In a word-for-word translation that would be just like that:

Miserere nobis,
Ora, ora pro nobs,
It’s how it will always be, ô, iaiá
It’s how it will always, they’ll ever be

I don’t think that’s a satisfying translation, as I can’t keep much of the poetry and rhythm of the original (as it often does on this blog). But the sense would be just like that. In Portuguese there’s no easy way to understand it either, so looking at the lyrics I only must say that it conveys a sense of loss and hopelessness. Once again, the lyrics are much more social and political than the psychedelia around it shows. This, I guess, has to do with what Glauber Rocha once said, in a misquote of Mayakovski, I guess, that without revolutionary form there is no revolutionary art. So, form and content are always related for them!

Just a note or two now. Where I say “slice of bread” the original says “metade do pão”. Metade is the word for half, but I thought that if I translated it for slice it would say more clearly that the subject is poorness and misery.

Afterwards, where it says “there’s bean and banana”, he really says this and not like that banana is a dessert. As you probably know, the Brazilian staple food is arroz e feijão, or rice with beans. It is common, though, in Northeastern and Southeastern Brazilian to mix arroz e feijão with banana. When I first saw this I found it kinda gross, but I must say it’s almost a perfect match.

farinha de muceque com feijão e banana

Finally, even if it looks awkward, I translated “Let’s hope one day a day will have” to keep the poetic word order of the original “Tomara que um dia um dia seja”. I could say more about the translation, but then I guess it would become very academical and boring. So here’s the first album translation.

See you all tomorrow.

PS: I almost forgot. The lyrics are composed by Gilberto Gil and José Carlos Capinam, the latter is also mentioned in Torquato Neto’s piece that I’ve translated yesterday.

PS 2: I haven’t translated the last lines of the lyrics too. The cool thing about they it’s that they form “Brazil fuzil”, which translates as “Rifle brazil”. A subtle message, eh?

Anúncios

Deixe um comentário

Preencha os seus dados abaixo ou clique em um ícone para log in:

Logotipo do WordPress.com

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta WordPress.com. Sair / Alterar )

Imagem do Twitter

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Twitter. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Facebook

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Facebook. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Google+

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Google+. Sair / Alterar )

Conectando a %s